Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
Hit enter after type your search item

5 tips to improve your seascapes

The post 5 Tips to improve your seascapes first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Nisha Ramroop.

The term seascape is used to describe a subgenre of landscape photography, where the subject is the sea, the beach or the ocean (or is compounded with). As with landscape photography, there is a certain amount of planning that goes out to a good day "at sea".

Here are a few tips to help you with your next salt excursion.

1. Angles and perspectives

So how do you want to tell your seascape story?

It is obvious to take pictures at sea level. You must include foreground elements to give your scene depth and interest.

If you have a higher level, use it for a different perspective.

When photographing from above, you can capture coastline shapes to your advantage. These include the coastline, cliff edges or other rocks and the way in which land and sea meet. The ocean works well if your foreground or middle ground is in the frame. Use the textures around you from different angles.

Most seascapes are made at large angles to capture the entire scene. Waves also make interesting seascapes. You can do this using a telephoto lens or by entering the water with your camera properly housed in an underwater housing. The latter is not that simple because it requires a completely different skill level.

2. Shutter speed

Because seascapes are all about water or use the water element in your composition, the shutter speed is an important consideration. In normal landscapes, your shutter speed mainly affects your sky, while you now introduce another important moving element to seascape photography. Thus, photographing water, and how the shutter speed influences this, teaches a long way to your seascapes. You can freeze those waves on time or take longer shots for a final result of smooth, silky water. It all depends on your desired result.

3. Pursuit

When you start photographing landscapes, you probably check the weather forecast beforehand.

For seascapes, it is also a good idea to check the ebb and flow times. The tides can improve interesting land elements at your location. Some areas can work well with both ebb and flood, while others are only accessible during low tide. This is a good reason why exploring a location helps you plan your outing.

Similarly, photographing the same area at different tidal moments can also be an interesting photo project.

Tidal pools are also excellent topics in the foreground, and as a bonus it can also be reflective.

4. How wet?

Sometimes you have to wet your feet to fully capture the beauty of the ocean. Other times you can even get deep into the knee. Saltwater, however, is the natural enemy of electronics, so keep your equipment safe, and more importantly, yourself!

It is better to photograph crashing waves from a distance. If you are in the area, choose a dry, safe position and have someone help you look out for rogue states. Wet rocks can be slippery, so be careful to walk on them.

Keeping your gear dry is also a challenge, especially the front lens of sea spray. Plastic bags or waterproof covers and microfiber cloths are very handy!

Tripods in the ocean are difficult to maneuver with the ebb and flow of the waves, but once you stand firm, you're all set.

When shooting on the beach, use tripod feet or implant the feet a few centimeters in the sand to increase stability.

Wash your tripod with fresh water as quickly as possible when shooting in the sea. Bear in mind that salt and sand can still get into the leg joints / extenders and can influence the sliding and locking functions.

Do you enter the water more often than not? Then a good recommendation is to buy a cheap, sturdy tripod that can be replaced. If this is not the case, you must disassemble your tripod to properly clean it.

5. Let's think about it

What could be better than a great sky? What about the reflection in a large body of water?

The magic of reflections is real and an expanse of the ocean offers a fantastic opportunity to capture it. When using other elements in the foreground, such as rocks, pay attention to puddles and puddles that are formed in them to add some extra interest.

Wet sand and rocks can also be reflective when waves deteriorate or during low tide. All these elements can come together to make a great composition. Wet rocks are another reason to take pictures after it rains.

Conclusion

Seascapes are definitely worth it. The ocean is always changing and you can make completely different catches at sunrise and sunset or between high and low tide.

Seascapes also work during the day when the sun is high and enhance those beautiful ocean blues and greens at different depths.

Plan in advance what you want to record. Which perspectives are interesting? Can you do something different than what was done before?

When you wet your feet, you do this safely for both you and your equipment. But above all, have fun! Respect the ocean and you can take great pictures while listening to the soundtrack.

improving your seascapes

The post 5 Tips to improve your seascapes first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Nisha Ramroop.

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar
Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views :
‚Äč