Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views :
img

Food Photography – When to use natural light (and when not)

Postal Photography – When to use natural light (and when not) it first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Suzi Pratt.

Food photographers, both professionals and amateurs, know that natural lighting is one of the best tools for taking drool-worthy photos. However, there is a time and a place to use natural lighting, and times when you do not want. In this article we will discuss what natural lighting is and how it affects your photos – in good fortune and misfortune.

What is natural lighting?

Simply put, natural lighting is produced by the sun. Another related term is ambient light, which refers to the available light in an environment. Ambient light can also be considered natural light if the photographer's equipment does not produce it. Natural light is abundant in most parts of the world and can be used free of charge. This is one of the many reasons why it is preferred by many photographers.

Two types of natural lighting

In general, there are two different types of natural lighting that you may want to use for photography. If you plan to use natural light for photography, it is wise to find out more about the different patterns of sunlight. Depending on where you live, you may have more than the other. You may have to adjust your style accordingly.

Direct light

Natural light - direct light

Direct sunlight that results in a look with harder shadows.

A cloudless environment with full sunlight in the middle of the day produces direct light. This light is very intense, resulting in high contrast and very sharp shadows. The color of the light depends on the time of day. ' In the afternoon it will be a neutral white color and a warmer tone of gold in the late afternoon. Depending on your photography style, you may prefer direct light if you want to emphasize dramatic shadows and high contrast.

Diffuse light

Natural light will be diffuse in a cloudy or cloudy environment. This results in a soft, low contrast look with little to no shadows. Most photographers tend to prefer this lighting because you can do just about anything with it. If you have a lot of direct light, you can also turn it into diffuse light by using something as a flash reflector.

Natural light_Eat photography 01

Natural sunlight softened with a diffuser.

What about artificial lighting?

The opposite of natural lighting, artificial lighting is produced by acceleration, such as speed lighting or flash units. If the idea of ​​flash photography intimidates you, consider this. Most forms of artificial lighting strive for natural lighting. For example, a bare flash without a diffuser looks like direct light, while a flash with a softbox produces diffuse light. Even if you plan to use artificial light, it helps to understand natural light and how it influences your creative style.

Natural light_Eat photography 01

Natural light or artificial light? This is of course …

Natural light_Eat photography 01

… this is artificial light. It adds a dimension to the background but is not drastically different from the naturally illuminated image.

When should you use natural light for food photography

Before you determine which type of lighting you should use, you must view your intended creative output. Do you want food photos with spicy colors and clearly defined shadows? If so, you want direct light and an unclouded, full sun day is what you want. But if you want soft, diffuse light for an evenly lit photo, then a cloudy day is best for you (or a sunny day with a reflector).

After you find out what your favorite creative style is, take a look at the weather. You may need to plan your photo session around weather patterns if you want a certain quality of natural light. Alternatively you must bring extra equipment to compensate for this.

Natural light_Eat photography 01

Food photographed in natural light during the day, when the light is neutral in color.

When you may not want to use natural light

There are two times of the day when natural light may not be your best friend. Those are the blue hours and golden hours of the day. These times of the day are cherished by landscape photographers because they offer the most dramatic lighting in the sky. This may not be ideal for food photography. That is because both blue and golden hours emit differently colored light. A dish that has been shot at blue hour can give it more blue hues, while the golden hour radiates it in a warmer tone. Part of this can be determined in post-production, but most food photographers prefer to take photos in neutral daylight, so that the food retains its natural color.

Natural light_Eat photography 01

Food photographed in natural light during blue hour, just after sunset. Natural light at this time of day distorts the colors around. Great for landscapes, not for food.

Finally

In general, the use of natural light is the simplest solution for photographers. It is fairly easy to use natural lighting, although adding tools to your kit, such as reflectors and diffusers, helps you take it to a higher level. Also useful is a general knowledge of lighting patterns during the day, so that you ultimately do not schedule natural light absorption during golden or blue hours (unless you want that colored light!).

What do you think? Are you a daylight photographer or do you prefer artificial light? Let me know in the comments below!

Food photography Light

Postal Photography – When to use natural light (and when not) it first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Suzi Pratt.

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar