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How to use Lightroom Classic with two monitors

The post ' Use of Lightroom Classic with two monitors ' first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Darina Kopcok.

how to use Lightroom Classic with two monitors

One of the best ways to improve your workflow in Lightroom is to use two monitors.

If you use two monitors in Lightroom, you can work faster. You can also search through your images faster. You can work with your thumbnails on one screen and the full-size image on another.

If you are a big shooter, such as a wedding photographer, you should seriously consider working with two monitors. You will notice that this can make your workflow more streamlined and productive.

Your second monitor does not have to be as large or as high-quality as your primary monitor. You can even connect a laptop to your monitor.

A set-up with two monitors is great to have when you are photographing tethered or traveling with a laptop.

Alternatively, you can have two stand-alone monitors, depending on the operating system you use or a computer with a built-in monitor, such as an iMac.

For example, in my own workflow I use a 27-inch iMac and a separate monitor of comparable size.

How to install two monitors in Lightroom

If you want to set up a dual monitor screen, first connect your second monitor and then ask Lightroom to recognize the secondary monitor.

Go to Window -> Secondary View -> View.

Then go to the monitor icons on the left side of the film strip -> click on the monitor icon with the label "2" to activate the secondary display.

The default value for the secondary display is Loupe View, but you can change it.

The other options are Grid view, Comparison view, Overview viewor People View. Click and hold the monitor icon marked with "1" to see these options.

People is where Lightroom identifies faces in images, including new ones that you add to your library. That way you don't have to assign keywords to manually tag people in your photos.

If you use the icon with the label ' 1 ' you will see a similar list of options for your primary monitor.

You can enlarge and zoom within photos Loupe View.

With magnifying glass on the second screen you can zoom in on the photo by clicking on the image. You can also right-click and change the color of the background of your workspace.

note that Loupe View has three different modes: Normal, live and locked.

  • In normalIf you click a thumbnail in grid view on monitor 1, you will see a large version in Loupe View on monitor 2.
  • In Life, the photo displayed in the Loupe view changes as you move the cursor over the thumbnails in the Grid view.
  • With Locked, the last photo being viewed in Loupe View will remain on the screen until you select one of the other modes.

To get access Normal view, click on a thumbnail Grid view on monitor 1 to display a large version that is displayed in Loupe View monitor 2.

While in Direct images, the photo displayed in the loupe view changes as you move the cursor over the thumbnails Grid view.

In Closed view, the last photo that was viewed Loupe View remains on the screen until you select one of the other modes.

Compare view in the secondary window offers the same functionality as the Compare View in the primary window.

Survey in the secondary display offers the same functionality as the overview display in the primary window.

Options for display with two monitors

You can adjust your workspace on two monitors in the following ways:

  • Use the develop module on your first monitor and switch on Loupe View on the second monitor. This allows you to zoom in on the second screen to check finer details such as noise, focus or for chromatic aberration.
  • set Grid view on the first monitor and Loupe View on the second monitor. You can view one photo on one screen and thumbnails on the other.
  • Use Grid view on the first monitor and Survey or Compare view on the second monitor. This is recommended if you want to delete images quickly.
  • Alternatively you can use Grid View on your second monitor and Loupe View on the first monitor.

To hide the upper or lower panels in the secondary view, click the gray arrows, just as you hide panels in the Lightroom main window. Click on them again to make them visible again.

The "Full screen" option in Lightroom is enabled by default. When you click it, the window on your second monitor is taken out of full screen mode, which gives you a window that you can reset and move around the screen.

You can swap the displays for Normal screen mode. In this mode you can drag and drop the window to the second screen, automatically changing the positions.

You can also display the second window as a floating window by clicking the Second Monitor button in the main window and deselecting Full Screen.

To close the second window, –> click the second window button, or click on it and deselect Show.

To sum up

One final note: make sure that at least the main monitor on which you view your final images is calibrated. You want to make sure that the color in your images is technically correct, especially if your images are printed.

If you have completed the post-processing of your Lightroom on one monitor, you will find that obtaining a second monitor will change the life of your operation.

Do you use two monitors? what's your opinion? Share with us in the comments below.

how to use Lightroom Classic with two monitors

The post ' Use of Lightroom Classic with two monitors ' first appeared at Digital Photography School. It is written by Darina Kopcok.

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