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Hyperminimal – Puzzle Games are gone

Puzzle games are generally all similar – usually it is about something that you have to move or an obstacle that you have to overcome, all within a time-bound interface or with a limited number of moves.

The most important characteristic of a puzzle game must be the right balance between challenge and frustration. Too much challenge and you make the player irritated, too little and they don't feel like they are doing anything useful.

To offer a challenge, most puzzle games provide a failure criterion or a kind of limited life system, all in an effort to get you to play to overcome adversity.

According to these definitions, Hyperminimal is definitely a puzzle game, but somehow it falls short of each of these criteria.

According to these definitions, Hyperminimal is definitely a puzzle game, but somehow it falls short of each of these criteria.

In Hyperminimal, tap to release a ball that shoots straight ahead in a line and tries to reach another orb. On the way are a variety of obstacles that will move in predictable patterns. The challenge is both when determining the timing and when stopping your ball midway by tapping and holding the screen.

You cannot actually stop your ball, only drastically slow it down, so you must not only avoid hitting the obstacles, but actively predict how long you have to wait before your momentum, even if it is delayed, gets stuck in a solid line.

This sounds pretty standard up to now, with little originality or effort. The frustration, however, lies in the forms used to offer obstacles.

Obstacles will intertwine each other and intertwine themselves, so you constantly have to predict what you are doing. Moreover, you have to struggle with this, because the orbit only flows in a straight line, you essentially have to tap a pattern to survive.

The only way to achieve this precise pattern is to repeat the same level endlessly, time and time again. There is no challenge or growth to do this, only endless frustration that culminates in an explosion full of frenzy that usually causes you to turn the game off.

You can bypass one obstacle after eight attempts, and then die from the next, despite your repeated attempts.

After eight attempts you can bypass one obstacle, and then die to the next one, despite your repeated attempts.

Although the ascetic choice in Hyperminimal, as the name implies, are hyperminimalistic and simple white and black colors, the pleasant color scheme does not diminish the endlessly frustrating, mind-numbing, irritating game.

The basis of the game is fundamentally solid, there is only so much that can go wrong with lines and a ball that moves forward, but somehow Hyperminimal manages to make it irritating and frustrating.

Our assessment

Pros Cons
The basic gameplay is neat enough in its simplistic puzzle design, as well as its beautiful color scheme. The obstacles are endlessly frustrating and confusing. The entire game revolves around frustrating gameplay decisions and endless irritation.
Rating
3/10

Hyperminimal (free+, App Store) →

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