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The best 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray movies

Updating: The epic war film Black Hawk Down by Ridley Scott makes a spectacular debut on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a whole new transfer – read more about it Page 5!

The best 4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray movies can offer you an experience that is close to a movie theater in your living room. In fact, with the advent of HDR, Dolby Vision and readily available Dolby Atmos sound systems, we would arguably be better. And don't forget the movie lovers among us who just want to watch certain movies time and again with the highest quality currently available for your home.

The image fidelity offered by the best 4K Ultra-HD Blu-rays comes closest to a true cinematic experience that cinephiles can get outside of a movie theater. And now that high dynamic range (HDR) is becoming more dominant day and night, color reproduction will make standard-definition films look horrible in comparison. The high resolution and HDR combine to offer you an experience that is different from anything you have probably seen in your own living room. That does not mean that the best 4K Ultra-HD Blu-rays will completely destroy everything you can stream online.

  • Need a player? Here are the best 4K Blu-ray players that you can buy now
  • And don't forget the best 4K TVs to get the best out of your movies

While it is true that some streaming services, such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, offer a good amount of content in 4K – for example Netflix Originals – you will have a big accident if you try to find the latest movies in 4K with HDR on those platforms. And even with older titles, finding titles that are compatible with both technologies will indeed be rare.

These streaming services may contain great content that uses your 4K TV, but it can take a long time before you can find the same amount of content offered by the best 4K Ultra-HD Blu-rays. And even if you decide to just wait, the image quality of streaming video doesn't even come close to the fidelity offered by 4K Ultra-HD Blu-rays.

With that in mind, we've put together a list of the best 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray movies you can buy today. Each of the discs in this list, regardless of how good the movies are, can be considered as & apos; reference quality & apos; and we have tested everything extensively to ensure that they are really worth our recommendation. Best of all, every 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray disc is region-free, so anyone with a 4K Blu-ray player can enjoy these movies.

Read on to find out which 4K Ultra HD Blu-rays made the list!

Aquarius

Credit: Warner Bros.

With the arrival of Aquaman from DC & apos; on 4K Ultra HD Blu-Ray, the format has received a new disc with reference quality that will certainly be used for years to show new televisions.

Although we have been scaled up from a 2K master (which we found to be more than suitable in cinemas, we can add), Aquaman offers an impeccable transfer filled with the gills (we went there) with onscreen activity – all of which is presented with incredible details .

It's no secret that 4K releases presented in the full IMAX aspect ratio are extremely spectacular to watch on a high-end television (you hear this, Disney?), And Aquaman is perhaps the best example of this.

According to director James Wan, about 90% of the film is shown in this way, and although that may be a bit exaggerated, almost all the major series of the film benefit from your entire screen, with immense brightness and color.

Speaking of color, Aquaman is a real showcase for a high dynamic range (both HDR10 and Dolby Vision are available), with its vibrant underwater world that offers enough dazzling to bring you into a visual sugar comma.

We have glowing purples, oranges and greens piercing through the deep blue sea – the first trip from Aquaman to Atlantis is an impressive sight to see – with realistic mirroring highlights reflected in armor and trident. Light rays also shine through the ocean surface with an impressive subtle color gradation.

Later in the film, a scene shows Arthur and Mera being attacked by The Trench while traveling by tugboat, and if there ever was an argument for the importance of increased resolution and contrast, then this is it. The solid unfolds ' during heavy rainfall at night while hundreds of gnante CGI creatures attack our heroes, and it is positively bursting in the seams with visual information.

Fortunately, Aquaman's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray can easily handle the complex scene, and it looks especially good on TVs that have deep black inks. A must-have release for fans of super hero films.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from a 2K master), HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Image format: 2.39: 1, 1.78: 1, Running time: 143 minutes

Deadpool 2

Credit: 20th Century Fox

As one of the first major titles on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, the original Deadpool impressed with impeccable transfer based on a true 4K digital intermediate form. Although the sequel, Deadpool 2, was ready for 2K and then scaled up for this 4K release, the drive still looks great, with a striking upgrade in detail and color compared to the regular Blu-ray.

Deadpool 2 has a steel blue look and feel for most of the film, but is not as lively as its predecessor. That said, there are several moments here where colors really pop up, such as the violent opening montage of the film, the explosive prison attack by Cable & a ' s and the big chase scene of the film. Like the first 4K drive of the item, Deadpool has received 2 HDR10 color correction, although Dolby Vision is absent.

Once again, mirror glides benefit enormously from the craftwork with a high dynamic range that the film has received, particularly in the light that reflects from Colossus & apos; shiny metal body.

Thanks to the resolution offered by the format, the object definition looks great – the stitching and texture of the Deadpool suit is the striking appearance on this disc, along with the incredibly detailed visual effects work used to create Cable & apos; s cybernetic arm and chest.

As an extra bonus, the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray from Deadpool 2 contains two versions of the film, with the Theatrical Cut and Super Duper $ @%! # & Cut each housed on its own 4K drive. Needless to say, fans of Deadpool 2 absolutely want to choose the film on the format.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from a 2K master), HDR: HDR10, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 7.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect Ratio: 2.39: 1, Duration: 134 minutes

Avengers: Infinity War

Credit: Marvel Studios

The kind of cinematic event for which 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray was made, Avengers: Infinity War explodes to the format with breathtaking HDR10 and Dolby Vision images and a fantastic Dolby Atmos audio track.

Although Avengers: Infinity War was completed on a 2K digital intermediate (possibly due to the huge amount of visual effects on the display), it was fixed at 6.5K, so the scaled-up end result looks exceptional, anyway.

We see an incredible definition and beautiful details throughout the Infinity War, especially in every scene with the towering computer-generated character Thanos. Thanks to the incredible work of the film's animators, Thanos & apos; face reveals excellent textures and lines, with the extra clarity of the resolution revival of the film and offers extra gravitas for the immersive motion capture performance of Josh Brolin.

Elsewhere, the Infinity War shines thanks to HDR10 and Dolby Vision color correction, giving the film incredible vibrancy and contrast. Highlights, for example, are incredibly strong here, with the thunderous on-call forces of Thor proving to be a high point. Skin tones also look warmer and more natural, especially in daylight scenes, such as the battle of the film.

The astonishing image of the film is a spicy Dolby Atmos song that offers impressive bombastics and atmospheres, while delivering a convincing three-dimensional soundscape.

Although we adore Avengers: Infinity War ' s full-frame IMAX sequences, it's hard to argue with what we've got here. Barring an unlikely 4K release of the IMAX version of the movie, this release is easily the best way to view Avengers: Infinity War at home for the foreseeable future.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from a 2K master), HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 7.1 , French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Image size: 2.39: 1, Duration: 149 minutes

The Avengers

Credit: Marvel Studios

Thanks to the clear, clear cinematography and the TV-friendly aspect ratio of 1.85: 1, The Avengers is the ideal 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray candidate. Everything great about the regular Blu-ray of the film is magnified here, with vivid HDR10-matched colors, improved contrast, brighter highlights and more detail across the board.

If you have a high-end television capable of intense colors and clarity, you will want to pick up this disc – The Avengers blinds in this respect, with the red, white and blue of Captain America ' s costume together with the green skin of the Hulk, which looks particularly lively here.

Night scenes, such as the forest fight between Iron Man and Thor, look especially good here: Thor's lightning bolts burn with white intensity against ink-black backgrounds and there is no sign of crushing into the darkness.

Like Avengers: Infinity War, The Avengers was mastered at 2K, although you would never know it based on the Ultra HD Blu-ray transfer – fine details are extraordinary here, especially in costumes and close-ups of characters.

Together with his excellent Dolby Atmos track, which delivers impressive bass and directional sound effects, The Avengers has made a fantastic debut on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. If you're a fan of the movie (and really, who isn't?), You wouldn't be disappointed by this great release.-

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from a 2K master), HDR: HDR10, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 7.1, French ( Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Aspect Ratio: 1.85: 1, Running time: 143 minutes

Black Panther

Credit: Marvel Studios

The Black Panther from Marvel was made with a resolution of 3.4 K and then finished at 4K. It arrives on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a disc that easily surpasses its 1080p counterpart thanks to extra accuracy in its color palette and a more natural appearance.

The film immediately impresses with its introduction scene from CGI. We get a quick history from Black Panther ' s country Wakanda, starting with the vibranium meteorite that donates the African nation with the most valuable (and technologically useful) metal in the world. The level of detail in the animation is very high and we can really appreciate the light and shadow benefits that HDR offers.

Admittedly, the disc is less impressive during the nocturnal jungle rescue that comes shortly thereafter, with some turbidity in the darkness, something that may or may not resolve itself when viewed on an OLED screen. That said, scenes set later in the night look stunning, including a chase through Seoul showing vibrant neon signs flashing on the various luxury vehicles featured in the action-packed set work.

But real, detail and color are the highlights on this disc, where the flamboyant costumes of the film look especially – take a look at the ritual ceremony of the combat ceremony, in which each tribe gathers in their traditional clothing to look at the country & apos; ; s top warriors compete for the right to be king.

Clarity is also amazing here, with the different textures and fibers of each costume with amazing details. A really great disc and a must-have for Marvel fans.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect Ratio: 2.39: 1, Running time: 135 minutes

Justice League

Credit: Warner Bros.

Although the film was completed on a 2K digital intermediate, this does not mean that Justice League does not look as stunning as Ultra HD Blu-ray. This is partly due to the 1: 78.1 aspect ratio, which films the entire image of your television (no black bars here), making these heroes appear larger than life during the process.

Like all Zack Snyder films, Justice League is filmed on film (to be precise 35 mm, although it was subsequently inflated to 70 mm using IMAX ' s digital media remastering), so you can get incredible details and extra texture expect here. The costume detail looks absolutely extraordinary with this transfer, especially in the texture of the Batman costume and the different surfaces of the super-complex outfit of The Flash.

When it comes to digital effects, Justice League also benefits from 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. Cyborg's CGI body, which consists entirely of shiny metal, lighting and wiring, looks particularly complicated and impressive, especially when it comes to reflective highlights.

As expected, shadows and dark areas (after all, this is a Snyder film) benefit enormously from the HDR color correction of the film and fans will be happy to know that the disc offers both HDR10 and Dolby Vision support. As for the soundtrack of the film, the Dolby Atmos number of the disc is muscular and bombastic, with a deep bass and clear dialogue that works well within a three-dimensional soundscape.

If you are a fan of the movie, the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray from Justice League is a must-buy, as it is likely to be your reference disc for the near future.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from 2K master), HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Spanish DTS 5.1, Portuguese DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Image format: 1: 78.1, Duration: 120 minutes

Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Arrived on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a scaled up transfer based on a 2K digital intermediate, Kingsman: The Golden Circle shines on the format thanks to a great HDR color depth and a substantial upgrade down to the smallest details across the board.

Colors are incredibly rich here, with the many sets and costumes of the film that look particularly vibrant in size. Explosions in particular look particularly lively and hot, while the skin tones look realistic and warm.

Although it does not come from a 4K master, the detail here is excellent, with fine lines and wrinkles that look particularly clean. Clothing looks pristine, with fibers and stitching clearly visible, giving the presentation of the film a more immersive look in general.

Kingsman: The Golden Circle, however, looks the best during its many slow-motion action scenes, in which we really take a good look at all the extra details that the format offers. Elsewhere, more fast-paced and kinetic action scenes, such as the chase of the film in the film, seem amazingly handsome.

Visual effects also benefit from the added resolution and visual clarity, whereby the robot dogs of the film get extra complexity in their moving parts. Generally, if you liked Kingsman: The Golden Circle, this is simply the best way to view it in your own living room.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Image format: 2.39: 1, Duration: 141 minutes

Wonder Woman

Credit: Warner Bros.

Making her wonderful debut on the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format, Wonder Woman looks good. Shot on a combination of 35 mm film and the use of the Arri Alexa 65 digital camera, Wonder Woman gets an incredible boost in visual loyalty, even if the digital intermediate was mastered by 2K.

Color reproduction and contrast are where Wonder Woman really shines, while the first one looks particularly beautiful during the scenes on Diana ' s own island of Themyscira. Blues and greens are particularly lush here and really sell the warm, sunny paradise environment. This contrasts brilliantly with the grim and gray World War 1 tone that covers much of the second half of the film.

This is where contrast becomes particularly important because a lot of detail is visible in the dark, dirty environments around the main characters. The smoke-covered battlefield of No Man ' s Land is especially breathtaking, with its layers of smoky depth that create the illusion of an atmosphere that you can hardly touch.

Dirt and debris fly when Diana marches in the line of fire, with each dot clearly visible and contributing to the atmosphere of the scene. Then there is Wonder ' s itself, whose famous red, blue and gold costume stands out gloriously in its war-torn environment.

For the fiery, explosive final of the film, the HDR color arrangement of Wonder Woman really delivers something when it comes to highlights in the fire effects and sparks that populate the scene. At every turn, Wonder Woman is a fantastic example of how this format is ideal for films like this.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (scaled up from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), English Dolby Digital 5.1 (448 kbps), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1 , French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Image format: 2.39: 1, Duration: 141 minutes

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Credit: Marvel Studios

James Gunn is in no way responsible for Disney and Marvel who finally jump aboard the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray train, the milestone director who insists that his visually spectacular new film, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, is released in the only format that could do it justice. And, what a first title! A reference quality disc if there ever was one, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is the kind of film that will raise doubts of young people and make them stand out.

The opening credits of the film, in which Baby Groot dances in the foreground while a lot of intergalactic action takes place in the background, is nothing short of breathtaking and takes full advantage of the superior level of detail of the format. See the neon letters that adorn each name in the credits, now bursting with a super bright and realistic glow. Behind Large you see an almost constant wave of rainbow-like fog and thousands of multicolored particles, now even more vivid thanks to the larger resolution of the disc and the wider color palette that HDR brings with it.

Detail is great too, with animated characters such as Rocket and Groot that look particularly detailed – just take a look at Rocket ' s realistic fur and the wood grain structure that Groot exhibits. Suits also get a striking texture boost – it is now possible to see fuzzy fabric and stitching.

What is really impressive is that the entire film maintains its visual chaos without dropping the ball. As the movie delivers more in terms of locations and visual effects, the number of show-stopping 4K HDR scenes is constantly growing, making it a disc that draws viewers from the beginning to the end. Contrast and color levels have also been chosen impeccably, whereby the disc avoids the blown out brightness that some releases on the format have unfortunately had.

If there is one drawback to the 4K release of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, it is that the IMAX sequences of the movie are not displayed full-frame in that dazzling shifting aspect ratio such as that on the 3D Blu-ray. Star Trek Into Darkness carried this kind of presentation on its 4K release and let our jaws stick to the floor, so it would have been great to see Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 presented in the same way.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39: 1, Duration: 137 minutes

Logan

Credit: 20th Century Fox

Fox does it again with another fantastic 4K Blu-ray with super hero theme, but this time the film photographs on the disc for a feeling of gritty realism, making it more than ideal for the Ultra HD treatment.

From the very beginning, Logan's opening night sequence sets the tone for what we will get from this HDR presentation. Although it is a low-light scene, we have no trouble seeing pristine details in the black limousine of the Logan and the surrounding desert.

When it comes to color reproduction, Logan displays a realistic palette that faithfully depicts the dusty, western style environments in which the film largely takes place. The shimmering sun in New Mexico also looks great in this presentation, with impressive HDR-enhanced highlights.

As the film progresses, we also begin to see a lot of wear on Logan's clothing and his skin, with bloody wounds that look very realistic. This is undoubtedly an advantage that the 4K Ultra HD presentation has inherited from its true 4K digital intermediate.

If you are in the United Kingdom or the United States, you may also have received a 4K version of Logan Noir, a black-and-white feature specially made for the home release of the movie. However, we could not test this monochrome version of the film, although it would be interesting to see how HDR can improve something in black and white.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, English DTS HD Master Audio 2.0, Aspect ratio: 2.38: 1, Running time: 137 minutes

Deadpool

Deadpool

Credit: 20th Century Fox

On the 4K Blu-ray release of his movie, Deadpool, director Tim Miller told TechRadar that "the Ultra HD shines amazingly in terms of detail". After we have thoroughly inspected the disc for ourselves, we must absolutely agree. The Ultra HD Blu-ray from Deadpool ends with 3K on the Arri Alexa camera and then ends with 4K. It is very similar to the theatrical presentation of the film, but with the added bonus of HDR – exclusively for the home release of the film.

Immediately visible at the first view, Deadpool offers a much higher level of visual details at 4K than the regular Blu-ray of the film. The Deadpool costume is by far the most striking element of the film and shows more fine details in the fabric and stitching, and the wider color range of HDR ensures that the different red hues of the costume not only stand out, but also more natural merge. As with most CGI and green screen-heavy films, the added resolution gives the film a slightly raised vibe, one that seems entirely intended by its filmmakers. The fully computer-generated character of the film, Colossus, also looks better, with HDR providing improved reflective lighting on the character's reflective metal housing.

Add to that a spicy and compelling Dolby Atmos soundtrack and Deadpool becomes one of the first must-own discs of the format.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, aspect ratio: 2.39 : 1, duration: 108 minutes

X-Men: Apocalypse

XM and Apocalypse

Credit: 20th Century Fox

X-Men: Apocalypse was originally recorded with 6K in the Redcode RAW format, which gives film makers a higher level of post-production control, making it perfect for HDR post-processing. Finished on a 4K digital intermediate, X-Men: Apocalypse comes to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray without losing visual fidelity. Showing visual effects if there ever was one, the end result, excuse the pun, is x-traordinary.

From the opening of ancient Egypt to the apocalyptic final, X-Men: Apocalypse blinds in Ultra HD. Costumes and makeup benefit enormously from the added resolution offered by the format, opening our eyes to the incredible work that fits into their creation. There is an immediately noticeable increase in detail and an additional texture depth.

As you would expect from a film in which characters often emit rays of energy from their hands / eyes / scepters, lighting effects are a special highlight here. Increased contrast and a wider color gamut mean that light blooms appear much more natural, avoiding the usual blocky glow that plagues images with a lower color depth. It is also an extremely colorful film, with numerous blue and purple characters on the grid. Thanks to the HDR and the added color gradations it offers, characters display much more individual details on the screen. Without a doubt, this Ultra HD Blu-ray is preferred for experiencing X-Men: Apocalypse.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Image format: 2.35: 1, Duration: 144 minutes

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Ultimate Edition

Batman v Superman

Credit: Warner Bros.

While director Zack Snyder typically shoots on 35mm film stock, his films can be scanned at 4K without real loss of visual fidelity. With Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Snyder also chose to capture certain parts of the film with 4K digital cameras and on 70mm film stock with Panavision 65 cameras. The film was then finished on a 4K digital intermediate, bringing the Ultra HD Blu-ray release quite close to what most people had seen at their local multiplex (or not what they saw at IMAX and 70mm screenings) ).

Admittedly, the film itself is pretty grim, dark and muted in the presentation, but that doesn't mean the 4K Blu-ray isn't super impressive – the added resolution and color depth of the disc make Batman v Superman look just as good if it is possible at home. HDR support provides great contrast and vibrant colors (when they appear). Fire in particular looks lively and lifelike and reaches a brightness level that makes it look even more glowing. Everything else on the screen has a finer definition, so you can really appreciate the detailed texture of the Batman suit, for example.

If you're a Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice fan, this 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray is a no-brainer – along with the recording of the more brutal and violent director & apos; s cut, the disk is also proof of how 4K and HDR can improve the overall viewing experience.

Technical specifications: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40: 1, duration: 182 minutes

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

The Amazing Spider Man 2

Credit: Sony Pictures

Just like Batman v Superman, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was shot on 35mm film and later scanned and transferred to a 4K digital intermediate. Whatever you think of the film itself, its Ultra HD presentation is completely sublime here. The TASM2 is lively and colorful everywhere and shines especially during the heavy effects of the set.

Watching Spidey swing through New York on sunny days is a real treat – the beautiful blue skies of the film really do justice to this transfer, presumably helped by some tinkering with the HDR. The red and blue of the Spider-Man suit twilight in a realistic way in the sunlight, and the added resolution makes the spandex's more striking in the wind.

However, the real highlight is the villainous character of Electro. With its translucent blue skin, constantly changing hues and pulsing with electricity, Electro ' s presence in the film is a real show-stop. The scene in which he reveals his new form in the middle of Times Square, surrounded by the huge electronic billboards of the area, is one of the most dynamic scenes I have personally seen on a television screen. Thanks to HDR, the many colorful lights of the scene emit a more naturalistic light bloom that never shows signs of bleeding in the background.

Het beste van alles is dat deze Ultra HD-presentatie van de film dit alles weet te bereiken zonder zijn filmische uiterlijk te verliezen. Een echt uitzonderlijke schijf.

Technische specificaties: Codec: HEVC / H.265, resolutie: 2160p (van 4K-master), Audio: Engels Dolby Atmos, Engels Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48 kHz, 24-bit), Spaans Dolby Digital 5.1, Frans DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, beeldverhouding : 2.39: 1, Looptijd: 142 minuten

Hommel

Afbeelding tegoed: Paramount Pictures

Exploderende uit de poort met de meest visueel spectaculaire scène van een Transformers-film, Bumblebee is een lust voor het oog op 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, waardoor het gemakkelijk is om Michael Bay's laatste films in de serie te vergeten.

Door het volledige scherm op te nemen dankzij de 1.78: 1-presentatie van de film, biedt Bumblee een duidelijke verbetering van de detailkwaliteit, ondanks dat het is opgeschaald van een 2K-master. De film maakt goed gebruik van zowel Dolby Vision als HDR10 en vertoont een fantastisch contrast en schaduwdetails tijdens donkere scènes, zoals de openingsstrijd op Cybertron, terwijl hij ook fantastische hoogtepunten en kleuren in vonken, laserstralen en explosies vertoont.

Zodra de actie van de film overgaat naar de aarde, blijft de 4K-presentatie van Bumblebee 's schijnen in een omgeving die veel helderder verlicht is. Hoewel de film een ​​showcase van visuele effecten is, wordt de overgrote meerderheid van de speeltijd op echte locaties doorgebracht, terwijl ons titulair personage interacteert met mensen. Opnieuw leiden de resolutie van de schijf en de mogelijkheden van het hoge dynamische bereik Bumblebee rechtstreeks naar het showcase-territorium, met huidtinten die levensecht aanvoelen en landschappen die extra mooi lijken. Sterk aanbevolen.

Technische specificaties: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: Dolby Vision / HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English: Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish (España) Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish (Latinoamérica) Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Turkish: Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.78:1, Runtime: 114 minutes

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Image credit: Lionsgate Films

Luc Besson knows a thing or two about crafting incredible science fiction visuals (or any visuals for that matter), having directed the classic film The Fifth Element. With Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the French auteur kicks things up a notch, creating off-world visuals so arresting, they alone warrant this disc a place in the collection of any serious Ultra HD enthusiast.

Similar to James Cameron's Avatar, the film exhibits an overwhelming amount of crystal clear CGI, and while that may give the film an artificial look, there's no denying the level or detail and artistry evident in every frame.

Witness, for instance, the scenes that take place on the pearl planet (pictured above), which are rendered entirely in a computer. There's an outstanding level of beauty on display here, with the scenes deep blues and bright highlights making great use of the format's HDR/Dolby Vision capabilities. Clarity is off the charts, with an impressively sharp transfer – you'd never guess Valerian was finished on a 2K digital intermediate.

The rest of the film, which is packed with high-octane spaceship chases and interplanetary action scenes, also looks outstanding, with the uptick in resolution revealing an astonishing level of detail throughout the film.

If you're looking for your next visually spectacular reference quality 4K showcase disc, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is it – well, at least until Aquaman arrives on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: Dolby Vision / HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English Dolby Digital 2.0, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital Plus 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 137 minutes

They Live (4K Collector Edition)

Image credit: Universal

CONSUME! CONFORM! OBEY! Ever felt like the world around you is subliminally pushing secret messages to you? That perhaps your work colleagues and those in power aren't quite what they seem? Just because you're paranoid, it doesn't mean they're not after you…

That's the crux of the brilliant premise behind John Carpenter's superb satirical sci-fi film They Live, in which pro wrestler 'Rowdy' Roddy Piper discovers that the world is slowly being taken over by alien invaders, which can only be seen by wearing special sunglasses.

The eminently-quotable 1988 cult classic has been lovingly restored for this very special collectors edition 4K release, which saw the original camera negative scanned at 4K resolution before being newly color graded by renowned cinematographer, Gary B. Kibbe.

It results in the best-looking edition of the film to date, and that's before you start looking at all the extras thrown in here – you're looking at the UHD disc alongside a HD Blu-ray presentation and HD special features disc, a CD soundtrack, a superb poster, five art-cards and a 48 page book that fans of Carpenter and the movie alike will lap up.

It's a dream package for fans of the film, while hardcore John Carpenter fans will also want to pick up the new 4K restorations of his other classics The Fog, Escape From New York and Prince of Darkness – each given a similarly-exquisite boxset release.

Technical specs: HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from original camera negative scanned at 4K /16bit), Audio: English 5.1 DTS HD Master Audio (subtitles in German, French), Aspect ratio: 1.78:1, Runtime: 94 minutes

2001: A Space Odyssey

(youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITv0MObg7DU)

What's there to be said about 2001: A Space Odyssey that hasn't already been said? Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Stanley Kubrick's visionary exploration of space, the future and the nature of life in this universe is as powerful today as on its day of release.

Often heralded for its groundbreaking visual effects work, it's incredible just how well the film holds up under the added scrutiny of this stunning 4K remaster. With this year seeing a release of a newly restored 70mm print (using elements made from the original camera negative) this re-release piggybacks off that work, with the 4K UHD HDR image mastered itself from the 65mm original camera negative. The Warner Bros team have gone as close to the source as possible here, giving an all-new UHD sheen to a marvellous film.

From the opening sun-rising glare to the decent into another dimension towards the film's end, the UHD presentation brings vibrant life to the dramatic range in the color palette. HDR visuals add depth to the dark expanses of space, punctuated by amazing miniature model work, with Dolby Vision support particularly well executed here. What's sadly missing is a Dolby Atmos soundtrack – what better way than to hear 'Also Sprach Zarathustra' in space than both above and around you? Alas, we'll have to wait longer. Still, the soundtrack has also been given a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 revamp, as well as there being the option to listen to the original 6-track theatrical audio mix, now formatted for DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1.

As a gift package it's lovely too – there's an excellent array of special features included on the disc, as well as great booklet and art cards within the sleeve. Whether a long time fan of the film or coming to it for the first time, it's a wonderful way to experience it.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Portuguese 2.0, Spanish 5.1, French 5.1, German 5.1, Italian 5.1, Polish VO 2.0, Aspect ratio: 2.20:1, Runtime: 149 minutes

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Image credit: Disney

The second Star Wars film to arrive on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Solo: A Star Wars Story faithfully represents the film's beautiful theatrical presentation, even if its image is slightly flatter than we're used to seeing on the format.

Like The Last Jedi before it, Solo boasts a true 4K digital intermediate, meaning that no upscaling has gone into the making of this release. As you'd expect, detail is exceptional here, though you won't find a lot of depth in the cinematography of Solo.

While some 4K releases carry a clean, almost three-dimensional appearance, Solo's tendency towards darkness, haze and muddy environments mostly prevents this outside of a few bright outdoor scenes (Solo's confrontation with Enfys Nest is a particular highlight in this regard).

That said, color comes up especially well here thanks to some fine HDR10 tinkering (Dolby Vision is unfortunately absent from this release), allowing for scenes that pop with a surprising amount of vibrance out of the film's dark environments.

Witness, for instance, the Kessel Run sequence, in which the Millennium Falcon must travel through a space storm filled with whirling colors and spectacular highlights. Elsewhere, the disc displays some standout color in Lando Calrissian's stylish yellow shirt.

It's worth noting that your enjoyment of Solo's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray may be affected by the television you use to watch it — on OLED or QLED displays with local dimming, there's a more noticeable depth evident in the film's darker scenes.

Though it's unlikely to be considered a reference quality disc by Ultra HD enthusiasts, Solo looks as good as can be on the format thanks to its faithful presentation and HDR color tuning.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 7.1, French Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 135 minutes

Predator 3-Movie Collection

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

In an effort to make up for past mistakes, 20th Century Fox has brought the Predator franchise (that's the standalone movies — the less said about Alien vs Predator, the better) to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a long-awaited new transfer for the film that started it all.

One of the most beloved action sci-fi films of the 1980s, the original Predator has surprisingly been shown very little love in the past when it came to its HD releases. As one of the worst examples of DNR (digital noise reduction) run amok, Predator's previous Blu-ray had all of its film grain scrubbed to the point where Schwarzenegger and his crew looked more alien than the titular creature itself.

Thankfully, the team behind Predator's Ultra HD has finally given fans a home video release that's faithful to the film's original, grain-heavy look. That isn't to say that Predator now looks like a new movie — given the film's harsh jungle setting and rugged shooting conditions, Predator can appear a little rough around the edges at times.

Detail, even in close ups, isn't particularly high, which is probably why DNR was employed so heavily the first time around. That said, there's a pleasing, healthy grain present throughout the film's running time, and occasionally, there are some particularly well-lit scenes that look extraordinarily vibrant and crisp on the 4K format. This is definitely the best that Predator is likely to look for the foreseeable future.

Moving on to what is arguably the standout disc in this 3-movie collection, Predator 2  looks fantastic thanks to the added richness of color afforded by HDR. The film's opening, set on the blisteringly hot streets of a crime-ridden Los Angeles, burns with extra intensity on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. You can almost feel the heat of the scene, with every drop of sweat realised with added detail thanks to the resolution uptick. Likewise, there's now extra clarity in the scenes which feature the Predator's thermal vision, with the reds, blues, yellows and greens looking especially vibrant here.

As the only movie in this collection to be shot digitally (and the only one made in the last decade), Predators looks expectedly good on the Ultra HD format. Upscaled from a 2K digital intermediate, Predators appears clean and sharp at all times, with close-ups revealing plenty of wrinkles and fine details thanks to the boost in resolution. Colors also appear more refined here than in previous releases, with the movie's interesting lighting choices offering a wide range of hues and tones. It's safe to say that you won't be disappointed with the appearance of Predators on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (Predators upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech  Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.35:1, 1.85:1, 1.84:1, Runtime: 107 / 108 / 107 minutes

Ready Player One

Image credit: Warner Bros.

The kind of film that begs to be seen at the highest quality possible, Ready Player One explodes onto 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with one of the most impressive discs we've ever reviewed — a surprise, given it comes with a 2K digital master.

Set in a futuristic world where people's virtual lives have become their primary ones, Ready Player One adopts an otherworldly, heightened visual style which lends itself to the 4K HDR format.

Characters and environments look incredibly detailed and highly animated, with Spielberg's sweeping camera movements capturing the chaotic in-game world of The Oasis in a way that other filmmakers could only dream of. A visual feast, Ready Player One's heavy use of color figuratively explodes from the screen thanks to the disc's terrific use HDR10 and Dolby Vision grading.

An early scene, in which the lead characters must compete in the most over-the-top race this side of Speed Racer, is bursting with hidden details and visual grandeur. In fact, it might be the most visually spectacular sequence to hit the format to date.

Outside of The Oasis, real-world sequences look fantastic, too, with perfectly-tuned skin tones and added detail in costumes and sets.

Add to this a roaring Dolby Atmos track offers incredible three-dimensional sound, and what you have in Ready Player One is a new reference quality disc to demonstrate your home theater with.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Turkish Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 140 minutes

Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Image credit: Disney

During the film's opening moments, and depending on your television, you may find yourself taken aback by Star Wars: The Last Jedi's first foray into HDR territory, with its familiar opening crawl taking place on a space background that looks a little more gray than we're used to seeing — especially in contrast to the pitch black bars above and below the film's 2.39:1 frame.

Don't fret — as soon as the action kicks in, you'll find an exceptional transfer worthy of such a mammoth release. Colors are greatly enhanced by the disc's HDR10 and Dolby Vision tinkering, exhibiting additional vibrance and brightness throughout the entire feature presentation.

Skin tones appear more natural, costumes appear more vibrant, lightsabers look brighter and hotter than ever… there's no end to the visual improvements that come from the inclusion of high-dynamic-range.

Perhaps the most standout sequence of the film, at least in terms of visuals, involves a lightsaber battle against a group of Praetorian Guards in Supreme Leader Snoke's red throne room (pictured above). The blood-red backdrop is vivid as can be, without displaying any color leakage or over-saturation. HDR brings a lot to the table here, showing incredible light-to-dark blending without obvious color gradations cropping up and ruining the image.

As this release is based on the film's 4K master (no upscaling here), the increased detail here is also worth writing home about. We're now able to appreciate the incredible costumes, makeup and visual effects work more than ever before, from the stitching in Finn's jacket, to the strands of fur all over Chewbacca's body.

Add to this an extraordinary Dolby Atmos audio track which makes great use of spacial audio and the film's bombastic score, and you can chalk up Star Wars: The Last Jedi as yet another reference-quality 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 7.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 152 minutes

Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049

Image credit: Warner Bros.

Perhaps not as immediately mind-blowing as the 4K release of Ridley Scott's masterpiece, Blade Runner (though that probably has to do with the film's steady format progression over the last 35 years), Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 shines on Ultra HD Blu-ray nonetheless.

Roger Deakins' incredible cinematography takes center stage here, with the film's futuristic locations receiving increased texture thanks to some smoky atmospherics, moody lighting and heavy rain. Flesh tones and costume detail also get a significant uptick here, with the higher resolution offering a significant increase in clarity over the film's 1080p presentation.

Boasting a true 4K digital intermediate (no upscaling here), Blade Runner 2049 looks almost as great at home as it did in the theater — we say 'almost' because the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray would've benefitted from the inclusion of expanded IMAX sequences (with shifting aspect ratios that show bigger images during key scenes), which many filmgoers witnessed during the film's theatrical run.

Other 4K releases have blown us away by including IMAX presentations (such as Dunkirk, The Dark Knight and Star Trek Into Darkness) as that added detail and clarity translates magnificently at 2160p resolution.

Still, we can't argue with what we have here, which is an exceptional HDR-supported disc that makes the best of the film's dark photography and neon-drenched settings.

We also have to commend Blade Runner 2049 exception Dolby Atmos audio track, with the film's bombastic score setting the mood magnificently. Spacial audio is magnificent here, bringing plenty of dimensionality to the film's sound effects. A truly great audio presentation.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canadian) Dolby Digital 5.1, , Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 164 minutes

War for the Planet of the Apes

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

One of the most impressive 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray releases to date, War for the Planet of the Apes is ape-solutely spectacular on the format (sorry). We all know how astonishing the film's visual effects are (read more about how they were created in our Weta Digital VFX report), but its photo-realistic apes hold up magnificently under the increased scrutiny of 4K and HDR (despite being upscaled from a 2K digital intermediate).

Unsurprisingly, fur looks especially good here, looking completely natural at all times, particularly with light shining through it. Facial textures also receive increased detail, with the various wrinkles in the apes faces looking extra defined.

Though the disc's increased resolution is a boon for video enthusiasts, the real showstopper here is the wider color gamut afforded by its HDR presentation. Much of the film is spent in darkness, yet we now get to see more detail and definition in those dark areas. Small details in costumes and props are now much clearer because of it.

The overall palette looks richer, too, with the film's forest settings feeling more lush and its white snow looking brighter and more tangible. Skin tones in humans also receive an uptick, looking warmer and more natural than they did in the cinema.

War for the Planet of the Apes is a must-own for fans of the series, thanks to its exceptional fine detail quality, deep blacks, and terrific use of HDR. Stay tuned for reviews of the other two films in the series, Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 139 minutes

Blade Runner: The Final Cut

Image credit: Warner Bros.

Remastered from a 4K scan, Blade Runner: The Final Cut looks absolutely astounding on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. We're not just saying that it looks good for an old film – it looks amazing regardless of when it was filmed.

The transfer reveals an exceptional level of clarity in what is generally a dark and smoky film. The noirish, rain-slicked, neon-soaked streets of futuristic Los Angeles look more detailed than ever, with the HDR-enhanced visuals giving us our best look at Rick Deckard's world to date.

Witness, for instance, the staggering level of detail found in the film's miniatures – one particularly shot showing the Tyrell building will blow you away with its clarity, revealing all the intricacies of the model in question, including the many glittering lights all over the structure giving you the illusion of thousands of offices within. You won't even mind that the illusion is slightly broken by the obviousness of the miniature work, because you'll be too busy appreciating the spectacular craftsmanship and on display.

Elsewhere, the whole film gets a visual uptick, with HDR helping significantly when it comes to the smooth gradation of colours and lighting. Clothing, skin textures and hair all look better in this version, and the various extreme close-ups of eyeballs all show extra detail now.

If you're a fan of Blade Runner, chances are that you already own The Final Cut of the film on Blu-ray. While it's highly likely that both releases come from the same 4K digital intermediate, this 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray version blows previous Blu-ray and HD DVD releases of the film out of the water. This is the best that Blade Runner has ever looked, period.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 2.0, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 118 minutes

Alien: Covenant

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

Though it's been upscaled from a 2K digital intermediate (much like the 4K release of director Ridley Scott's previous film, The Martian), Alien: Covenant looks expectedly magnificent on the Ultra HD Blu-ray format.

As this is a dark film with a muted palette (despite its many outdoor daytime scenes), an emphasis has been placed on HDR's ability to provide deeper, more lifelike contrast, much to the benefit of Alien: Covenant's astounding cinematography.

Colors appear richer, too, standing out even more against the film's greyish blue tones. The alien itself also looks magnificent, with its inky-hued skin receiving added translucence and detail, benefitting from the disc's improved contrast and wider color gamut.

Those of you with OLED TVs will get an even better viewing experience, with the technology's infinite contrast taking full advantage of the film's tenebrous atmosphere.

But it's not all about the Xenomorphs – the film's human characters also look terrific thanks to the 4K release's bump in resolution and enhanced colors, with faces revealing extra definition and skin tones looking warmer and more naturalistic than the film's SDR presentation.

Adding to the film's immense visuals is a beefy Dolby Atmos track that focuses on atmospherics with occasional moments of bombast. Admittedly, we wish the disc offered a DTS Headphone:X track, as that would've made for an appropriately nerve-jangling experience akin to the recent video game release, Alien: Isolation.

Still, we can't complain, as Alien: Covenant's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release is hard to fault when it comes to the film's video and audio presentation. If you're a fan of the film, consider this a must-have.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 122 minutes

Geest in de schaal

Image credit: Paramount Pictures

As you might expect, Ghost in the Shell looks glorious on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, with its neon-drenched cyberpunk setting really popping on the format. Though much of the film takes place in dark areas, the disc impresses throughout, particularly during scenes where vibrant colors are juxtaposed against dark environments.

We were also blown away by how well the special effects stand up in this increased resolution, given that the film was finished at a 2K resolution. Still, you only have to watch the film's first major action sequence (pun intended), in which Scarlett Johansson's Major character applies active camouflage and blasts through a window to shoot down some haywire robot geishas, to get an idea of how impressive this presentation is. The scene is bursting with color and HDR-enhanced highlights, with reflective glass flying through the scene and slow-motion gunfire at every turn.

Still some viewers might be taken aback by the film's many dark scenes, though they truly come alive when combined with OLED's capacity for infinite contrast. This is truly a demo-worthy disc in that regard.

Also, while some film buffs may scoff at a film that isn't presented in the letterbox format, Ghost in the Shell looks fantastic as its 1.78:1 aspect ratio fills the entire frame – particularly impressive during overhead shots of the film's futuristic cityscape.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.78:1, Runtime: 116 minutes

Passengers

Image credit: Sony Pictures

Shot at a resolution of 6.5K and then finished with with a 4K digital intermediate, Passengers soars on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. An ideal candidate for demonstration purposes, the format allows the viewer to truly absorb the impeccable craftsmanship that went into the film's exception production design and special effects work. Taking place entirely on an enormous spacecraft. Passengers offers ample opportunities for glorious space gazing and futuristic interior design.

There are times in this 4K presentation when the photographic clarity of the film is so high and lifelike, it almost feels like you're watching a play. Other times, the digital photography is so clean and sharp, that it gives the film an unreal quality, almost like it's partly animated. Of course, this is completely intentional and only serves to make Passengers look even more astounding on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. Of course, the film's HDR colors contrast level keep everything in check.

Skin tones are remarkably true to life, and while the film's stars come across a little too beautiful at times (seriously, no one can look Which great at all times) Passengers is exactly the kind of film that the 4K Ultra HD format was made for. It's a showcase for gorgeous people hanging out on stunning sets doing remarkable things with the help of magnificent visual effects.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 116 minutes

Lucy

Image credit: Universal

Arriving on Ultra HD Blu-ray with an absolutely stunning transfer sourced from a 4K digital intermediate, Lucy demonstrates the strengths of the format by showcasing immense fine detail, exceptionally-realistic skin tones and textures, and truly-dynamic color reproduction throughout.

From the film's opening scene, which features Lucy the primate in a prehistoric setting, this presentation solidifies its place as one of the format's best reference-quality discs. The detail in the hominid's face and fur is utterly astounding, as are the colors and textures in its surrounding habitat.

As was mentioned earlier, skin tones and textures are also incredible on Lucy's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, looking supremely lifelike at all times. Seriously, if you can find pores and imperfections on the face of someone as beautiful as Scarlett Johansson, you know you've reached an unparalleled level of clarity.

Likewise, as the film starts to veer into true science-fiction territory, the disc continues to shine, displaying vibrant HDR-enhanced colors and terrific contrast. Even if you only have a passing admiration for Luc Besson's trippy action film, you owe it to yourself to check out Lucy on 4K Blu-ray.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 89 minutes

Oblivion

Image credit: Universal

As a science-fiction film with a very sleek and minimalistic art design, Oblivion makes an ideal candidate for the added resolution of 4K. Though the transfer was taken from a 2K digital intermediate (common with visual effects-driven films), Oblivion looks sharp and clean, if not immediately mind-blowing.

With that said, as the film enters its darker scenes, the impressive color gamut and contrast afforded by the film's HDR grading give the film a real sense of depth and vibrancy, particularly in the film's indoor drone shootout sequence. Bloom lighting and sparks from the scene's many explosions burn white-hot, showcasing the brilliant brightness that 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray is capable of. Likewise, close-up shots of the drones show a wonderful level of detail.

Though the film has a mostly washed-out grey and blue tone, skin tones appear quite naturalistic and at times appear to be the most vibrant thing on screen. Facial textures also excel, showing fine details like pores and individual hairs in Tom Cruise's five o'clock shadow. Grime, cuts and bruises also look benefit from the format's added clarity.

Giving the film a visual uptick in every category over the standard Blu-ray edition, for fans, this is by far the best way to experience Oblivion.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 125 minutes

Pacific Rim

Image credit: Universal

The reference-quality Blu-ray disc of Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim threatens to stomp the rest of your Blu-ray collection and land itself at the top of the pile for visual quality.

Though the film was finished on a 2K digital intermediate, much like Star Trek Into Darkness, this does not stop Pacific Rim from looking utterly sensational on Ultra HD Blu-ray. Shot in the 1.85:1 aspect ratio, your entire television screen will be used to display the film's many giant robot vs monster set pieces.

Thanks to some HDR tinkering, the film's colors and contrast now look even better than they did when the film was in theatres. Witness the rainswept battle that opens the film to see how good its vivid colors look against the inky blacks of a night-time sky. The added resolution afforded by 4K Blu-ray makes the rain look more detailed and realistic. Sparks that fly within the Jaeger cockpit are also more clearly defined and burn hotter than ever before.

Though the entire film is a showstopper, anyone that has seen Pacific Rim will know that its mid-film Hong Kong monster battle is the best-looking section of the film, and believe us when we say that it has never looked better than it does on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. The city's neon-soaked skyline radiates with beautiful and realistic bloom lighting, making the best of the film's high-dynamic-range upgrade.

Even if you already own Pacific Rim on 3D Blu-ray, you owe it to yourself to see how incredible the film can look on 4K Ultra HD. This is absolutely a reference quality disc.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.85:1, Runtime: 131 minutes

Independence Day: Resurgence

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

Sourced from a true 4K digital intermediate, Independence Day: Resurgence roars onto 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray without losing any detail whatsoever – in fact, the film's presentation is improved by the inclusion of HDR (that said, the ultimate way to watch a film of this magnitude will always be on the biggest cinema screen possible).

A much darker and gloomier picture than its predecessor, Independence Day: Resurgence features many scenes surrounded by inky blacks that would look exceptional on an OLED display. Unfortunately, we didn't have access to one for testing purposes, so we can only say that the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray's increased contrast and vivid colors make Independence Day: Resurgence look fantastic on any HDR-compatible TV.

Its various scenes of computer-assisted citywide destruction unfurl on screen with an extreme level of visual clarity and detail, acting as a showcase of what the 4K format is capable of. Many times, the film's turquoise alien tech takes centre stage, glowing with a naturalistic light bloom that never shows obvious signs of color gradation (see the film's opening scene to see how well light fades into darkness).

If you're a fan of the film, there's no better way to watch Independence Day: Resurgence than on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 120 minutes

Chappie

Chappie

Image credit: Sony Pictures

Director Neill Blomkamp (District 9) is known for his knack for seamlessly blending science fiction elements into everyday scenarios, offering a uniquely down-to-earth view of a world filled with robots and aliens. His film Chappie is no exception. Set mostly around the slums of Johannesburg, Chappie's mostly daytime action allows this 4K HDR presentation to really pop.

Shot by Redcode RAW (5K) cameras and finished on a 4K digital intermediate, Chappie's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray practically mirrors what was shown in theatres, only with HDR providing improved contrast and more naturalistic colors. The detail in the titular robot character is astonishing, with the steely greys and blues of his frame making the orange highlights of his arm and antenna stand out even more. You can also see details in Chappie's dirty, scratched body that just weren't visible on the film's regular Blu-ray. Best of all, the expressive LED lights on Chappie's face now show much finer detail, making the character seem even more like a real world object, and not just a marvel of computer-generated wizardry.

Though the film can be quite grimy at times, it's got a lively, vibrant undercurrent to it, employing a Day-Go style thanks to Chappie's co-stars, the rap-rave group Die Antwoord. The group brings its signature art style to the film's costumes and set design, all of which looks fantastic when aided by HDR's wider color gamut. Now, bring on District 9 and Elysium in 4K!

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 120 minutes

Star Trek

Star Trek

Image credit: Paramount Pictures

Though it's been 'upconverted' from a 2K digital intermediate (which is what you likely saw in theatres upon release), J.J. Abrams' first Star Trek movie looks absolutely wonderful on 4K Blu-ray – the release actually lends some weight to argument that Ultra HD discs don't need to come from a true 4K source in order to impress.

Director J.J. Abrams' may be guilty of relying a little heavily on his 'lens flare' technique on both of his Star Trek films, but the effect looks better than ever here thanks to HDR's increased color gamut and contrast levels. Light blooms looks completely natural, avoiding harsh shade transitions entirely. Elsewhere, the Ultra HD Blu-ray offers amazing detail when it comes to facial textures on the film's many creatures and alien races – Eric Bana's Romulan character Nero looks especially good, with the disc's increased resolution showing just how great the film's Oscar-winning make-up and facial prosthetics are.

While Star Trek's Ultra HD Blu-ray disc may be outclassed by its sequel's truly (inter)stellar 4K release (listed below), this is by far the best way to experience J.J.'s first voyage on the USS Enterprise at home.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, 1.78:1, Runtime: 132 minutes

Star Trek Into Darkness

Star Trek Into Darkness

Image credit: Paramount Pictures

When it comes to the visual quality, the Ultra HD Blu-ray for Star Trek Into Darkness is absolutely mind-blowing – we'd even go as far as calling it the most impressive 4K release on this list. With over 30 minutes of the film shot in the IMAX format, J.J. Abrams' Star Trek Into Darkness cuts back and forth between a traditional 2.40:1 letterbox presentation for its non-showy scenes, and the more vision-encompassing 1.78:1 aspect ratio for the film's spectacle-driven moments (this presentation is exclusive to the film's Ultra HD release). Though the film looks great throughout (despite being sourced from the film's 2K digital intermediate), the level of detail displayed in these IMAX scenes is absolutely astonishing.

From its very first scene (pictured above), in which Kirk and Bones are chased through a vibrant red forest by the primitive Nibiru tribe, Star Trek Into Darkness will make an instant believer of any 4K/HDR naysayer. Witness, for instance, the cracked, flaking skin on the faces of the Nibiru tribes people, shown up close and in great detail. Marvel at the naturalistic skin tones, visible pores and wrinkles shown on actors Chris Pine and Karl Urban's faces, offering a level of immersion that 3D just cannot compete with.

Another scene, in which Spock drops down into a volcano, is also a showstopper – with its swirling specks of fire and ember, and contrast enhanced greatly by HDR, the scene becomes a showcase for the emerging 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format. Until more IMAX-enhanced films start to be released, consider Star Trek Into Darkness your go-to 4K reference disc.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, 1.78:1, Runtime: 132 minutes

Trolls

Image credit: DreamWorks

Looking like a cotton candy machine exploded in a glitter factory, Trolls is one of the most vibrant and colorful films currently available on the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format. And, as you'd expect, there are huge HDR-related benefits to owning the film in 4K over the still admirable regular Blu-ray version.

First off, the colors are astonishing. This is visual eye candy to the max, and while you might expect the vibrancy to be dialled up significantly on the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release, the disc's HDR allows for more naturalistic blending and shading. Combined with improved brightness and color, the overall presentation achieves a richer, more nuanced color palette that avoids looking sickly sweet and garish, and manages to do so without losing its vividness.

Then comes the disc's fine detail, which receives a tremendous uptick at the 4K resolution. Each of the trolls in the film has a furry, felt-like texture that comes across even stronger when you can see fine hairs swaying on their arms and faces. Of course, their big colorful troll hair looks even more realistic than ever before. An impressive release that demonstrates the subtleties of HDR's wider color gamut, Trolls is the most impressive animated 4K release to date.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.35:1, Runtime: 92 minutes

Labyrinth

Image credit: Sony Pictures

Starting with an outdoor scene shot in natural light, Jim Henson's classic family film Labyrinth does not immediately impress on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. Looking soft and full of grain, you'd be forgiven for thinking that not a lot of work has gone into this transfer.

However, once these initial minutes pass, and as the film moves into studio sets with professional lighting and controlled environments, the real Ultra HD magic begins. It's at this point that Labyrinth's brand new 4K scan (sourced from the original 35mm negative) becomes truly mind-blowing.

Taking advantage of the format's added resolution, Labyrinth shows extraordinary detail in the film's many puppets. Fur looks sublime, with individual strands of hair becoming clearly visible. Quite frankly, they look so good, it's almost as if you could reach out and touch them. The film's fantastic makeup work and matte paintings also hold up magnificently under the increased scrutiny of 4K.

Though Labyrinth's 4K Blu-ray provides an incredible visual upgrade in all areas, perhaps the most important thing about this release is that it manages to keep the film's original filmic texture, with no digital noise reduction to speak of. Though we're watching a digital scan, the presentation always feels film-like.

Labyrinth has never looked better than it does here, and while this presentation can't top the likes of Star Trek Into Darkness in terms of spectacular visual clarity, for a 30-year-old film populated mostly by puppets, this release is a triumph.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 2.0, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 101 minutes

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows

Ninja Turtles

Image credit: Paramount Pictures

Boasting incredible detail and rich, vibrant colors, the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows is a noticeable step up from its already impressive regular Blu-ray release. Look closely and you'll notice that each of the turtles has realistic, scaly skin textures that make you understand just how much work has gone into bringing these characters to life – heck, you can even see the enamel on their teeth!

Other digital characters also look fantastic. Notice the individual textures given to Bebop and Rocksteady, giving each creation its own unique look and texture. Splinter also impresses, with the added resolution on display allowing you to see individual hairs and whiskers that weren't as noticeable in regular HD.

Though most impressive during its daytime scenes (which include the film's spectacular, effects-heavy finale), TMNT: Out of the Shadows also impresses in the darker subterranean moments set within the turtles' sewer lair. The color palette and contrast on display are exceptional, adding a real depth to the image. Fans should consider this 4K Blu-ray release as the definitive way to watch the turtles' latest big screen adventure.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 112 minutes

The LEGO Movie

The Lego Movie

Image credit: Warner Bros.

One of the things that immediately strikes you about The LEGO Movie's Ultra HD presentation is that the film has received a significantly brighter and more vivid color palette. Not only that, contrast has also increased by leaps and bounds, making the film's characters look even more like real, stop-motion minifigs – even fingerprints are visible, despite everything on screen being computer generated. Touches like this are what makes 4K and HDR so important to our overall immersion in the film.

Notice the deep blacks in any scene featuring Batman, or the beautiful, naturalistic bloom lighting found in the Old West portion of the film, or how about the gorgeous orange light emitting from film's spaceship (SPACESHIP!!) finale?

Though this release has been upscaled from a 2K master (the film was captured at 2.8K), The LEGO Movie looks incredible in Ultra HD. Vibrant colors and wonderful contrast levels make this 4K release an essential purchase for fans of the movie.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Dutch Dolby Digital 5.1, Catalan Dolby Digital 5.1, Flemish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 101 minutes

Black Hawk Down

Image credit: Sony Pictures

Arriving on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a brand new transfer (based on a true 4K master), this release of Black Hawk Down's utterly destroys its dated regular Blu-ray.

Dialling up the contrast on the film significantly, the new transfer boasts an incredibly striking image with some of the deepest black levels and shadows we've seen on the format. We're talking Army Rangers appearing as silhouettes against the blinding Mogadishu (actually Morocco) sunlight.

That it manages to achieve such strong highlights while also reaching pitch black levels of darkness, all without a hint of crushing, is just a testament to the quality of the film's new scan and the power of high-dynamic-range.

Purists will be pleased to hear that Black Hawk Down's intensely gritty appearance has been maintained on this UHD release, with the healthy presence of film grain lending the film an increased sense of frantic authenticity. Detail is astonishing, particularly in close-ups where faces reveal individual pores and grains of dirt. Explosions and flying debris also look spectacular thanks to the uptick in resolution.

Easily one of the best catalogue releases we've seen on the format to date, Black Hawk Down's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray is a must-buy for fans of the film and well worth double-dipping if you already own a previous version.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), French (Canada): Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish (Castilian) Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish (Latin American) Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.38:1, Runtime: 152 minutes  (Director's Cut), 144 minutes (Theatrical Cut)

Widows

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

Shot on 35mm film and then finished on a true 4K digital intermediate, Widows arrives on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray looking as great as it could possibly look.

Without sacrificing its filmic presentation, Widows receives a terrific transfer that embraces healthy grain while offering improvements over the standard Blu-ray across the board.

Exhibiting deeper contrast and excellent shadow detail, the film looks especially good during its numerous nighttime scenes. Witness, for instance, a heist scene that takes place late in the film – despite being set late at night in an indoor environment without a whole lot of lighting, it's very easy to follow the action and know exactly what's going on at all times.

Although the film is relatively muted and steely from a color standpoint, the colors that are there manage to punch through the darkness with added vibrancy thanks to the disc's HDR10+ color tuning. If you're a fan of adult thrillers, you should definitely consider adding Widows to your 4K collection.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10+, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 130 minutes

Bad Times at the El Royale

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

A rain and neon-soaked noir thriller, Bad Times at the El Royale lends itself nicely to the detail-focused 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format. Thankfully, its true 4K transfer does not disappoint, offering the definitive way to watch this multi-threaded film.

Though Bad Times at the El Royale takes place almost entirely at a single location, there's plenty of visual variety to be found during its hefty running time. Thanks to inclusion of HDR10+ support (sorry, no Dolby Vision to be found here), the film excels during early daylight scenes, exhibiting a warm and pleasing image that feels lifelike and cinematic at the same time.

Of course, the film mostly takes place at night (mostly), and that same HDR10+ tinkering allows for some exceptional shadow detail and contrast that lets us see additional details buried within the darkness in some scenes.

As you might expect, colors also pop with added vibrancy, particularly in the presence of neon lighting and the film's funky late-sixties set decorations, however, the most impressive instance of HDR's importance may well be attributed to skin tones, which appear healthy and natural at all times.

Throw in a wonderful Dolby Atmos audio track which provides the film with a truly convincing three-dimensional soundscape, and it's clear that Bad Times at the El Royale is a must-own title for fans of the film.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10+, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 142 minutes

Bohemian Rhapsody

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

Just like Queen's music, the musical biopic Bohemian Rhapsody soars on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with incredible picture quality and a triumphant Dolby Atmos audio track that will rattle your living room with its stomp-inducing power.

Captured at both 6.5K and 3.4K resolutions (though we're unsure of which resolution the film was finished at), Bohemian Rhapsody's 4K Ultra HD presentation is one of fantastic clarity and depth, with fine details like facial hairs and lines receiving increased visibility and sharpness.

Thanks to the inclusion of the advanced HDR10+ standard, the film's colors are exceptionally vibrant and lifelike, with increased shadow detail and impeccable contrast balancing things out for a truly eye-popping image overall. Though Dolby Vision is specified to be part of the film's cinematographic process, the format is sadly not included on this disc.

Regardless, it's hard to fault this release of Bohemian Rhapsody. Not only does it look sensational, arguably improving upon the film's theatrical presentation, it also sounds the business, too – both Dolby TrueHD 7.1 and Dolby Vision audio options are available, with the latter offering enhanced nuance and directionality.

If you love Queen's music and want a disc you can sing along to, you owe it to yourself to make Bohemian Rhapsody part of your 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray collection.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10+, Resolution: 2160p (master resolution unknown), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese DTS 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 135 minutes

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

While not the kind of film that immediately screams to be owned in 4K, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is a good example of how the benefits of Ultra HD Blu-ray can make the viewing of a great movie more enjoyable.

Thanks to some subtle HDR color tuning, Three Billboards feels warmer and more true to life in its appearance than it does on the film's standard Blu-ray release. Skin textures display a more lifelike hue, with the additional detail found in fine lines and wrinkles bringing the characters' weariness right to the forefront.

Environments also receive a boost in color and detail, which is particularly noticeable in the green grass and trees surrounding the film's titular billboards (which themselves appear less saturated than they did in theaters).

Contrast is another area in which the film has improved on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray — a night time scene in which one of the characters attacks the town's police station with molotov cocktails truly comes alive thanks to some exceptional shadow delineation, making the scene's red hot flames look more vibrant in the process.

Sure, it's not as visually splendid as something like The Shape of Water, but Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri absolutely looks better on the format, making it the definitive way to watch the film at home for the foreseeable future.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS 5.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1,Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese DTS 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 115 minutes

Murder on the Orient Express

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

What a surprise this turned out to be! Shot on Panavision's large 65mm format (captured at 6.5K and finished at 4K), Murder on the Orient Express looks unexpectedly sublime on Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Detail is, quite frankly, amazing in Murder on the Orient Express. From the exquisite fabrics of the cast's period-accurate costumes, to the lines in their faces and the whiskers in their (absolutely huge) moustaches, the bump in resolution brought by this 4K disc is exploited for every pixel it's worth here — and we're super happy about it.

Colors are also more vivid and natural-looking here, with the disc's HDR10 tuning working wonders on the film's rich palette. Skin tones are true to life, and the film's expert lighting from cinematographer Haris Zambarloukos (who worked with director Kenneth Branagh on the first Thor) comes across beautifully on this transfer.

If you have an OLED television, you'll likely marvel at the film's night scenes, in which the dark corridors of the Orient Express' carriages disappear into inky darkness, showing you additional detail if and when the film chooses to do so.

Topping it all off is a wonderful Dolby Atmos audio track that creates a convincing soundscape as the train chugs along, and a subtle score that adds to the film without succumbing to overpowering bombastic music. Highly recommended for fans of the film and Poirot stories.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English DTS 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1,Spanish DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 114 minutes

It

Image credit: Warner Bros.

The latest adaptation of Stephen King's terrifying novel It arrives on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with an exceptional transfer (despite being upscaled from a 2K master) that is improved by the inclusion of HDR10 and Dolby Vision.

Though a lot of the film takes place in dark and dank environments, visibility is always high in It, with some perfectly-judged HDR and Dolby Vision tinkering letting you see all the detail in the shadows without sacrificing all that creepy darkness.

Detail also receives a huge boost thanks to the added resolution of this 4K presentation, most evident in the crackling clown makeup on Pennywise's forehead, and the exquisite detailing of his freaky costume. Admittedly, some CGI elements become more obvious in 4K, but the trade-off is totally worth it when it comes to the disc's high dynamic range presentation and the increased detail seen here.

It also packs one of the most bombastic and effective audio tracks of any 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray released to date, with perfectly balanced Dolby Atmos and DTS tracks that will scare the pants off of you. You'll hear every creak, every noise, and every scream with the utmost clarity, depth and dimensionality.

One of the best 4K discs released to date, It is a must-have for horror fans, especially those with access to TV that supports HDR10 or Dolby Vision.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Dolby Vision, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English DTS 5.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 135 minutes

Dunkirk

Image credit: Warner Bros.

The best film of 2017? It's got to be up there. Christopher Nolan's take on the harrowing evacuation of Dunkirk at the height of the second World War is a masterclass in tension, practical effects and historical storytelling.

Playing with time and the sequence of events over the nail-biting rescue, Nolan takes full advantage of the IMAX format to bring an epic scale to the horrors of war, with a soundtrack that melds scraping atonal notes with the sounds of the death-dealing machinery bearing down on the troops. You'll be on the edge of your seat from the moment the very first shot is fired until the credits roll.

It's not to be missed then, and it's a particularly impressive disc to have in your 4K UHD Blu-ray collection. With the majority of the film shot in 70mm for IMAX screens, your full screen will often be taken over by the lapping waves and grim beaches of Dunkirk, presented with a fine sharpness that brings out the incredible detail in the recreated period piece. HDR visuals also make the action sequences really pop, bringing an added depth to what may have appeared as a muted, almost watercolor-like presentation in digitally projected cinemas.

That soundtrack isn't undersold either (it really has to be heard to be believed, at as loud a volume as the neighbours can stand), but note that Dolby Atmos is not supported here.

If you're a fan of Christopher Nolan, all his other movies (barring Memento) are now available in 4K HDR too. As many are older titles, you need to be ready for a slightly softer upscaled presentation, but the HDR benefits remain clear to see. You'll find The Prestige, The Dark Knight Trilogy, Interstellar and Inception in stores alongside Dunkirk.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (4K master), Audio: English DTS:HD Master Audio, Dolby Digital, Aspect ratio (variable): 2.2:1 & 1.78:1, Runtime: 106 minutes

Patriots Day

Image credit: Lionsgate Films

Here's a film that doesn't need a blockbuster scope or enormous amounts of CGI to dazzle on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray. Patriots Day recounts the devastating events surrounding 2013 Boston Marathon bombing in a very naturalistic and matter-of-fact kind of way.

The film aims to put you right there during not only the explosions that changed everything, but the eventual chase to capture the assailants responsible. In this regard, the film's cinematography succeeds magnificently in capturing a sense of realism, thanks to some incredibly sharp digital photography (captured in 3.4K with a 2K digital intermediate) and exceptionally lifelike HDR color grading.

Skintones are as close to reality as I've seen from any film on the 4K Ultra HD format. Lines and pores are clearly visible, and make it even easier to read the emotions displayed on the characters' faces.

Later in the film, during an extended night-time firefight in suburbia, the disc jumps to another level of clarity entirely. Shadow detail gets a huge boost, making it easier to follow the action in what would normally be an underlit setting.

In fact, we'd go as far as to say that Patriots Day acts as a showcase for what HDR can bring to a films lighting and color palette, with fire taking on an especially important role. Surprising as it may be, this is a demo-worthy disc.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS:X, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English DTS Headphone:X, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 133 minutes

Hacksaw Ridge

Image credit: Lionsgate Films

Though sourced from a 2K digital intermediate, Hacksaw Ridge arrives on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a gloriously-detailed transfer that's bolstered by a terrific HDR color gamut.

In its first half, the film radiates with natural-looking light and the kind of clear cinematography that only digital cameras can achieve. Though the disc's increased resolution makes it easy to spot green screen work on a couple of occasions, the added clarity that's made possible by the Ultra HD format far outweighs these minor infractions.

Later, the added detail provided by the format's higher resolution, as well as the wider color gamut it offers, brings a shocking level of detail and an added feeling of authenticity to the film's many gruesome war scenes. If you find intense scenes involving bloody viscera and shredded appendages hard to stomach, you're going to have an even harder time experiencing them on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Elsewhere, high-dynamic-range allows the film's cinematography to really shine, showing very realistic color and light reproduction, especially in dark scenes. At times, Hacksaw Ridge's war scenes forego realistic color palettes in favour of a stylised, almost monochromatic look. Here, HDR allows you to really notice the different shades at work, rather than simply looking dull and grey. These scenes are also punctuated by a barrage of explosions, juxtaposing bright bursts of color over a bleak battlefield.

Top this off with a dynamic and concussive Dolby Atmos audio track, and what you have in Hacksaw Ridge is one of the best releases on the format.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39: 1, Runtime: 131 minutes

The Neon Demon

Image credit: Broad Green Pictures

One of the few 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray titles that doesn't come with HDR enhancements, Nicolas Winding Refn's horror thriller The Neon Demon looks utterly glorious on the format nonetheless. If you want to get your hands on the film in razor-sharp 2160p, you'll have to import this English-friendly German release, which includes all the special features found on the regular Blu-ray in the US and UK – don't you just love how all 4K UHD discs are region free?

With regards to the disc's lack of HDR, you may be surprised to learn that the famously-visual director is actually quite color blind. An inability to see midtones has led Refn to favour high contrast and extreme colors throughout his career, as evidenced by the films Drive and Only God Forgives. Because of this, it's probably safe to assume that he wouldn't get much out of the high-dynamic-range experience.

Sourced from a 4K master (but shot at 3.4K), The Neon Demon looks incredible on Ultra HD Blu-ray, with its high resolution offering a noticeable uptick in detail over the 1080p version included in this package.

Aside from its 4K resolution, deep blacks and scorchingly vibrant colors are the big selling point here – though we were unable to test the film on an OLED television, the promise of individually-lit pixels beaming and pulsing out of the pitch black darkness of certain scenes has us giddy at the possibilities on hand.

Essentially a feature-length exercise in immense style and cinematography, it would be hard to imagine a film more suited to the 4K Ultra HD format.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English DTS HD-Master Audio 5.1, German DTS HD-Master Audio 5.1 Aspect ratio: 2.35: 1, Runtime: 118 minutes

Deepwater Horizon

Image credit: Lionsgate Films

Based on the devastating true story of an enormous oil rig disaster that occurred in 2010, often cited as one of the largest man-made disasters in history, it is perhaps in bad taste to describe Deepwater Horizon as a tremendously visceral and visually spectacular film, given the lives that were lost on that fateful day. Regardless, we must still call 'em like we see 'em, and Deepwater Horizon looks incredible on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Director Peter Berg (The Kingdom, Lone Survivor) brings his tough and gritty film to the format with exceptional results. Though the film was finished on a 2K digital intermediate, Deepwater Horizon delivers strong detail and impressive dynamics, with its HDR enhanced presentation offering great depth and color reproduction.

Witness, for instance, the fantastic textures in the many scenes featuring actors smeared in oil and covered in dust and debris. Likewise, the film's many explosions burst with astonishing clarity thanks to the format's higher dynamic range. Fire is so bright that you can almost feel the heat emanating from your screen.

Visuals aside, Deepwater Horizon's audio presentation also receives top marks, with a Dolby Atmos presentation that will shake your living room once those aforementioned explosions start. The film's audio dynamics will bounce around your room, placing you right in the action. Helicopters flying overhead are particularly impressive here, making Deepwater Horizon a reference quality disc in both video and audio categories.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 107 minutes

The Shallows

Image credit: Sony Pictures

Providing even more proof that you don't need a 4K master to get exceptional 4K UHD Blu-ray results, the entertaining shark attack movie The Shallows has emerged on the format with an absolutely sublime audio and video presentation.

Upscaled from a 2K master, The Shallows looks astonishingly crisp, with the film's digital photography lending immense clarity to the film's many surfing scenes. Witness, for instance, star Blake Lively's resting 'beachface', which reveals detailed pores, fine lines and even the salty texture of someone who's spent all day swimming in the ocean and soaking in sun rays. Unsurprisingly, the waves look spectacular, too.

Also complementing The Shallows' incredible visual presentation is an amazing Dolby Atmos track which faithfully reproduces the film's clever sound design. It's a muscular track that really puts you in the action, handling all of the film's audio dynamics with ease. Scenes where Lively is submerged make your living room feel like it's underwater, and one particular moment where an underwater GoPro shot breaks through the surface makes your ears pop like the real thing.

Occasionally, the added resolution of the disc makes some of the film's shark attack scenes look a little fake, but overall The Shallows is one of the best looking and sounding releases that the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format has produced. Highly recommended.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Turkish Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 86 minutes

The Revenant

The Revenant

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

As close to a flawless 4K presentation as the format has so far produced, The Revenant looks utterly fantastic on Ultra HD Blu-ray. Shot digitally at resolutions of up to 6.5K (and finished on a 4K digital intermediate) using only natural light sources, The Revenant offers a very natural-looking presentation, giving the audience a more authentic idea of what it must feel like to be in the freezing wilderness alongside Leo and Co.

Compare the The Revenant's 4K disc to the regular Blu-ray packaged with it, and you'll notice that the discs provide quite different presentations of the film. This is because director Alejandro G. Iñárritu and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki re-graded the entire film in HDR exclusively for this UHD release. By comparison, the regular 1080p Blu-ray looks much cooler, with more dominant blues and greys taking centre stage. Meanwhile, the 4K disc offers more naturalistic skin tones and a warmer overall palette, making the film's many icy landscapes appear whiter and more true to life.

Speaking of landscapes, the added resolution and contrast of The Revenant's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray makes them appear more grand and breathtaking, offering more fine detail and depth. Improved bloom lighting also lets the sun shine without bleeding into obvious and distracting shade transitions. A reference disc if ever there was one, The Revenant belongs in everyone's 4K collection.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 156 minutes

The Meg

Image credit: Warner Bros.

Look, no one's ever going to mistake The Meg for a great film, but it is great looking, meaning fans of the giant shark extravaganza should be more than satisfied about its terrific presentation on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

Thanks to its bright transfer and colorful palette, The Meg shines on the format, despite being upscaled from a 2K master. Color is impressive across the board, particularly during the film's many deep sea and under water set pieces, with the various shades of blues predictably fairing quite well thanks to HDR's wider color gamut.

Of course, the uptick in resolution also allows us to appreciate The Meg's impressive visual effects and production design, which all looks quite expensive. The titular megalodon is also a sight to behold, especially if you have a large television.

As for the film's human characters, we get some very naturalistic skin tones and a nice amount of detail when it comes to fine lines, pores and stubble. Highlights also impress, particularly when it comes to underwater lighting.

If you're a fan of The Meg, there's really no reason to pass the film up on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, as it's unlikely to look any better than this for the foreseeable future.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: Dolby Vision / HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1, English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (48kHz, 16-bit), English Dolby Digital 5.1French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish (Castilian) Dolby Digital 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Hindi Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Thai Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 113 minutes

Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Image credit: Paramount Pictures

One of the greatest action blockbusters of the last decade has arrived on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray in Mission: Impossible – Fallout, and thankfully, the disc's presentation is as spectacular as the film itself.

The disc's transfer, which is based on a true 4K master, predictably shines in the film's many action sequences. However, it's worth noting that the film has a fairly significant filmic grain throughout most of its non-IMAX scenes (more on those shortly). This was a deliberate choice from director Christopher McQuarrie, who shot most of M:I – Fallout with 35mm anamorphic film cameras with the intention of giving it a more gritty look than its predecessor.

While the whole film looks great, it's not understating things to say that the film's two IMAX sequences, which are faithfully presented here in the full 1.90:1 aspect ratio, are utterly sublime.

The first sequence, which sees Tom Cruise perform a dusk-set HALO (high altitude, low open) parachute jump, is a brilliant example of what HDR can bring to darker scenes, showing incredible detail in the darkness and making great use of the format's wider color gamut in those sunset hues.

The star or the show (aside from Tom), however, is the film's climactic helicopter chase, which sets the bar in terms of thrilling IMAX showcase sequences. The aspect ratio opens up as soon as the scene begins, and there's a noticeable jump in quality where the picture becomes crystal clear, exhibiting not even the slightest hint of grain. Quite frankly, there's a huge uptick in visual clarity overall during this sequence, which is especially detectable due to the well-lit nature of this daytime chase.

If you love this film, there really is no reason to pass up this stellar 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release. It's worth it for the IMAX sequences alone.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, 1.90:1 (IMAX), Runtime: 147 minutes

The Shape of Water

Image credit: 20th Century Fox

A release that expectedly leans into the green, teal, aqua and blue portion of the color spectrum, The Shape of Water looks beautiful on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, managing to totally convince in regards to its immaculate costuming, set decoration and makeup effects work, despite its increased resolution and tweaked HDR colors.

Those aforementioned greens, teals, blues and aquas? They actually take on a more naturalistic appearance on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, with the disc's high-dynamic-range tinkering giving the film's colors a more true-to-life quality than it displayed in theaters. This is particularly noticeable during The Shape of Water's underwater sequences, which now look richer and show no signs of obvious color gradation or banding.

While the film is visually sublime in every respect, its warm cinematography displaying a masterful use of light and darkness, the real highlight is the creature that captures our lead heroine's heart. The uptick in fine detail afforded by the disc's increased resolution allows us to marvel at the creature's stunning makeup, despite the fact that the film has been upscaled from a 2K digital intermediate.

For fans of The Shape of Water, this truly is a must-have release. While it would've been nice to have a Dolby Atmos track (imagine how great the flooded apartment scene would sound with three-dimensional audio), it's hard to fault this reference quality disc.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR: HDR10, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French DTS 5.1, German DTS 5.1, Italian DTS 5.1, Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Japanese: DTS 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.85:1, Runtime: 123 minutes

Atomic Blonde

Image credit: Universal

One of the most stylish films of the year, Atomic Blonde screams onto 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with an incredibly vibrant and neon-soaked transfer that burns with intense reds and is cooled again by striking blues.

As you've probably come to expect from the format, color reproduction is extraordinary here, with HDR making the '80s-inspired cinematography a real boost in the vividness department.

Clothing, hair, skin tones all look realistic here, despite the muted color palette of some scenes in this Cold War spy movie. Oh yeah, and the various cuts, bruises and scrapes acquired by lead star Charlize Theron as she kicks butt across Berlin also look appropriately gnarly, too.

Though it lacks a Dolby Atmos track, the DTS:X Master Audio one featured here does a terrific job of pummelling your ears with various explosions, gunshots and an expertly-crafted playlist of thumping '80s tunes. If you loved John Wick, this is definitely one for your collection.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, HDR10, Dolby Vision, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS:X, English DTS 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish DTS 5.1, French DTS 5.1 French (Canada) DTS 5.1, Portuguese DTS 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 135 minutes

The Fate of the Furious

Image credit: Universal

The eighth film in the blockbuster Fast and Furious franchise sings the praises of 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray thanks to incredible HDR-enhanced brightness, driving home just what the format is capable of (see what we did there?)

Flesh tones look astonishing on this disc, as do the HDR-enhanced explosions that litter the film. Colors also impress – witness the opening race in sunny Cuba to see how much of a difference HDR makes to this kind of film.

Another show-stopping scene involves a prison riot, with vibrant orange prison uniforms standing out even more than on the film's regular blu-ray.

The disc also presents the film in Dolby Vision as well as HDR10, which should be exciting for people who own TVs that can support the format and the added color depth that it brings. For everyone else, the disc defaults to standard HDR, which is still very impressive.

Perhaps the film's most standout sequence though, involves a huge frozen lake and a submarine. The white ice that surrounds this setting really allows the film's HDR/Dolby Vision presentation to flex some real muscle, with bright highlights getting a good workout.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English DTS:X, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), English DTS Headphone:X, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 136 minutes

John Wick: Chapter 2

Image credit: Lionsgate Films

Immediately exhibiting the benefits of increased resolution and the wider color gamut afforded by the inclusion of HDR in its presentation, John Wick: Chapter 2 comes out of the gate firing on all cylinders with a visually-sensational night-time chase through Manhattan (actually Montreal).

Surrounded by lights and colorful billboards, the disc's HDR-enhanced contrast allows viewers to peer into the darkness and clearly see objects and details that they'd normally normally miss in regular high definition. Witness, for instance, the film's show-stopping shootout inside the catacombs in Rome – the characters are enveloped in darkness and yet we can clearly see everything that's going on thanks to some terrific lighting and high-dynamic-range magic.

Immediately prior to that scene, a night-time concerto amongst the ruins of the Baths of Caracalla in Rome demonstrates incredible highlights, with red and blue LED lights surrounding the stage as spotlights swirl around in all directions.

The incredible visuals just keep on coming with this release. We have a shootout in a museum where vibrant red blood splatters over a number of statues, a neon-enhanced 'hall of mirrors' battle inspired by Enter the Dragon, fight scenes taking place in a dark and vivid underground metro, and the list goes on and on. One of the most dynamic releases on the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray format, this is absolutely the best way to experience John Wick: Chapter 2.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (Upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 122 minutes

Mad Max: Fury Road

Mad Max Fury Road

Image credit: Warner Bros.

Mad Max: Fury Road's 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release brings with it some enormous expectations, as the film is one of the more visually dazzling action blockbusters in recent memory. Thankfully, Fury Road absolutely delivers, despite having been upscaled from a 2K digital intermediate. This might seem like a bummer, but that's how the film was presented in theatres, and it looked pretty freakin' good there, didn't it?

With its colors undergoing a re-grading process in HDR, Fury Road looks more sensational than ever in Ultra HD. The film's many explosions now burn with added intensity, and improved contrast and increased resolution give the film a more painterly appearance, especially in the film's huge storm sequence.

Some might argue that this makes Mad Max: Fury Road's CGI stand out more, I believe it only adds to the film's artistic quality. Elsewhere, you'll find more realistic skin tones and textures, brilliant lighting, richer landscapes and shinier chrome. Mad Max: Fury Road's Ultra HD release is definitely worth the upgrade for fans, though we'd love to see what the added resolution of 4K and HDR could do with the film's new Black and Chrome version.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit), Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Portuguese Dolby Digital 5.1, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.40:1, Runtime: 120 minutes

Warcraft: The Beginning

Warcraft

Image credit: Universal

Though you'd expect HDR to make films more vibrant and colorful, Warcraft's presentation has taken a more subtle approach to the film's coloring. Less garish than its regular Blu-ray counterpart, Warcraft's Ultra HD presentation offers more naturalistic colors, especially when it comes to orc skin tones. That's not to say that this presentation is muted in any way – Fel magic looks spectacularly vivid and bright, giving the film a suitably other-worldly and fantastical appearance.

As expected, the real show-stoppers here are the orcs, lovingly realised through terrific motion-capture performances and CGI wizardry (as opposed to the other kind of wizardry seen in the film itself). Lead orc Durotan's facial expressions are more detailed and realistic, thanks to the disc's bumped-up resolution. Getting to actually see fine lines, wrinkles and textures in these characters' faces make them much more believable (though the illusion is still broken whenever they're standing next to the film's human characters). Other CGI creations, like the Gryphon Lothar rides during the film's climax, or the kingdom of Azeroth itself, exhibit an exceptionally high level of detail.

While it is another example of an upscaled film sourced from a 2K digital intermediate, Warcraft's 4K presentation nonetheless offers enhanced clarity, improved contrast and naturalistic tones. This Ultra HD release is definitely the best way to watch Warcraft: The Beginning in 2D.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 2.39:1, Runtime: 123 minutes

Sausage Party

Image credit: Sony Pictures

The idea behind Sausage Party was for Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg to create a hilariously filthy R-rated animate comedy with Pixar-level animation. While it doesn't quite reach those lofty heights, the film looks fantastic on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray nonetheless.

Finished at 2K and then upscaled to 4K, Sausage Party still manages to eek out a whole lot of extra detail over its regular Blu-ray counterpart. This is largely thanks to some HDR tinkering, which gives the film's colors and lighting a more detailed and pleasing look overall.

Certain foods gain extra details in their textures, with the sausages themselves looking like real objects that you can touch. In fact, the move to high-dynamic-range makes everything look more realistic (while still keeping that stylised animated look).

Sure, there are better-looking CGI animated films available on this blossoming format (just look at our Trolls entry in the family movies section), but Sausage Party still looks good enough to eat. For fans of the film, this is as good as it's ever going to look.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (upscaled from 2K master), Audio: English Dolby Atmos, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 16-bit), Czech Dolby Digital 5.1, French (Canada) Dolby Digital 5.1, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 5.1, Russian Dolby Digital 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.85:1, Runtime: 89 minutes

Planet Earth II

Image credit: BBC

Okay, so we're cheating a little bit here, as BBC's Planet Earth II is a documentary series, not a movie. However, much like how the first Planet Earth series was a showcase for the Blu-ray format, Planet Earth II proves to be an astounding demo disc that easily highlights the 4K Ultra HD format's greatest strengths.

With numerous locales spread over six episodes, Planet Earth II gives the viewer a whole lot of variety in the eye candy department. In the first episode alone, the crystal clear waters of the Caribbean are juxtaposed against the volcanic majesty of the Galapagos islands, offering lifelike HDR visuals at both ends of the color spectrum.

Creature close-ups are astonishing in their sharpness, exhibiting high detail in faces and fur. Just as impressive are the series' signature drone shots, which give you a bird's-eye view of various landscapes, including mountains, jungles and even cities in the final episode.

A major selling point of Planet Earth II is that it was all captured in Native 4K and is presented here exactly as intended by its creators. Add to this the otherworldly feel attributed by the use of slow motion photography, and what you have is the definitive 4K Ultra HD disc to make people's jaws drop. A must-have addition to any serious 4K collection.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1  (48kHz, 16-bit) Aspect ratio: 1.78:1, Runtime: 300 minutes

Blue Planet II

Image credit: BBC

Although we're still waiting for the BBC to show any signs of actually broadcasting 4K content (occasional iPlayer experiments notwithstanding), the veteran broadcaster has made some first steps into the format by shooting a couple of its prestige nature documentaries in Ultra HD.

Blue Planet II is the second such documentary (after Planet Earth II, above), and focuses on the wildlife that can be found in our planet's oceans.

The whole documentary is stunningly presented, with the sheer richness of the ocean's colors a sight to behold. The HDR10's wide color gamut is put to fantastic use with the rich hues present throughout each episode, and we were particularly fond of the HDR highlights found on the show's florescent deep-sea creatures.

Other discs might offer technically superior visuals with mastering of up to 4,000 nits, but for us nothing will compare to the raw beauty of nature captured in uncompromised 4K.

Technical specs: Codec: HEVC / H.265, Resolution: 2160p (from 4K master), Audio: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Aspect ratio: 1.78:1, Runtime: 360 minutes

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